What’s The Difference Between an Elevator Speech and a Power Message?

 

In this post, I’m going to talk alot about power messages and little about elevator speeches. The topic of topic of elevator speeches is covered in my post called Does Your Elevator Speech Stop at the Right Floor?

If you’re self-employed and your business mostly relies on referrals from colleagues or others, you’ll want to have an elevator speech and power message. Your elevator speech is aimed at those people in a position to refer business your way. Your power message is what you say to potential customers or clients. Your power message generally takes place on the phone.

Why do you need both an elevator speech and a power message? You  might ask, “Why can’t I say the same thing to both referrers and prospective clients?” Use your power message when a potential client wants to know what you do and how you can help them. Focus on what you do within the context of what is in it for the potential client or customer. Your power message is less scripted than your elevator speech.

What do you say if a prospect initially asks you how much you charge? I call this type of prospect a ‘shopper’. First, do not answer the question. Second, do not launch into your power message. Ask a few benign questions such as, “What are you looking for? Have you talked to others in the same business?” If you are unable to redirect the conversation back to the other person, then quickly land the plane by simply stating your fee (or a range of fees). Try once more to turn the conversation back to the customer. Shoppers shop for bargains. You are not a bargain-basement store.

Is it okay to use jargon in your power message? It depends on who the customer is and how much knowledge he or she has about your business. It may be fine to use some jargon with a customer who knows your business. If you have a customer unfamiliar with your business, the moment you start to use jargon, you will lose the customer’s attention. The conversation automatically shifts back to you instead of focusing on the prospect’s needs. See my post Here Comes the Jargon Police.

Now it’s time to write your power message. Aim your message at the person most likely to purchase your product or service.

Here’s an example of a power message used on the phone.

I worked with a fitness studio to create a new marketing program. One objective of the marketing plan was to get prospective clients to call the studio for a complimentary training session. The owner was targeting men over age 50 who had metabolic syndromes (Metabolic syndromes are clusters of conditions – increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels – that occur together, increasing risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. (www.mayoclinic.org).

“My name is Meg B. and I’m the manager at Fitness Strength & Training in Any City, USA. I have been a personal trainer for the past 11 years and have a Bachelor’s Degree from Penn State in Kinesiology. I’ve worked with people who are diabetic, elite athletes, and many weight-loss clients. Fitness Strength & Training is a unique fitness studio because you receive a personalized exercise experience, nutrition coaching, and most importantly, accountability. All of our training sessions are conducted one-on-one in semi-private rooms to eliminate dis- traction. We help people realize their true potential as we coach them towards a healthier lifestyle. “I’d be happy to offer you one complimentary training session. Also, I’d like your contact information so I can send you our newsletter.”

Notice this power message contained the three parts:

  1. Information about the trainer
  2. Information geared to helping the client
  3. A strong landing or closing

This power message is only 126 words. She said what was needed and stopped.

A power message is not as structured as an elevator speech. Meg clearly articulated the goal of training: a healthier lifestyle. It’s the “What’s in it for me (the client)” part of the message and she smoothly, in a self-assured way, landed the plane.

Here are some do’s and don’ts concerning your power message.

  • Don’t tell the caller what you don’t do
  • Frame all conversations in a positive way
  • Your power message should be modified to fit your website, online business presence, other online professional listings, or additional promotional information.
  • Practice your message. Write it down and say it out loud.
  • Have someone listen to your power message. Ask him or her to give you feedback. Ask for one thing he or she liked about your message and one technical suggestion he or she might have for you.

Having a strong power message will make you a more powerful businessperson.

For more tips on elevator speeches and power messages go to http://www.criticalconnectionsbook.com

 

 

Fight Challenge With Strength

Let’s talk about your strengths that help you reach your business goals, and challenges that might prevent you from becoming successful. When participants explore their strengths
 and confront their challenges in my marketing workshops, they feel better equipped to make their business goals a reality.

A strength is a trait, characteristic, or skill that comes effortlessly to you. If something comes naturally to you, it’s a strength that you most likely enjoy using. More ethereally, you can’t be great at doing something unless it’s a strength. Even when others recognize your strengths, you might minimize them because  your strengths might be taken for granted.

A challenge is an activity that takes you out of your emotional and intellectual comfort zone and could cause anxiety. When you face a challenge, you’ll need to harness many of your internal strengths to achieve success. My psychotherapist friends like to say that dealing with a challenge can be an area of personal growth.

You often hear people refer to one’s strengths and weaknesses. I equate weakness with helplessness. I see weakness as a fault emanating from the world of negativity. Not good. Living in a world of negativity is a bummer. Negativity begets more negativity.

There are two different approaches to working with your strengths and challenges. First, you identify your strengths and use them to their fullest advantage. Second, you recognize your challenges and work to overcome them. Your strengths are not necessarily related to your challenges, but they can be.

Ben’s Story

Here’s an example of how one of my marketing workshop participants worked on his strengths and challenges. Ben is a 28-year-old graphic designer. He currently works for an advertising agency and wants to leave the agency to start his own graphic design studio. I asked him to tell me one key strength he would bring to building his own business. He immediately replied, “I’m creative!”

Next, I asked Ben to describe the most difficult challenge he faces in building his business. He hesitated for a few seconds, and then said; “I’m always second guessing myself about my ability to be creative. I question whether I’m able to sell and whether I’m good enough to compete in the market.” For the first time, Ben was able to articulate his challenge.

Next, I asked Ben to carefully look at this difficult challenge. Then I probed deeper and asked him if there is some other way in which he might be second guessing himself. Ben looked down for a few seconds. He seemed to be somewhere else. “I don’t know.”

Another question. “Ben, think hard now. What, if any internal messages do you have about yourself that would make it difficult for you to overcome your challenge?”

Now Ben was deep in thought. “I’m not smart enough to be doing this,” Ben revealed. “My parents always compared me to my older brother who I thought was smarter. But it extends farther than that.

“Ben,” I asked, “is there something positive you would like to tell yourself in place of your negative message?” Ben replied, “I’m a competent, creative professional”.

I gave Ben a pen and an index card and asked him to:

  1. Write this positive message on the card

2. Display the card in a prominent place where it can be seen every day

Now that Ben had a clear picture of his new positive message, we went on to the next part of the exercise. I asked him if he had at least one concrete idea to address his challenge of second guessing himself. Ben, feeling more confident, said he would make a list of his recent accomplishments.

Finally, I asked the other workshop participants if they had any ideas to help Ben.

Someone suggested that Ben call one of his colleagues and friends to remind him that he’s a competent professional. Another suggested that Ben reread his list of accomplishments when he would start to second-guess himself. My suggestion was a straightforward message for Ben to say to himself: “I have an amazingly successful track record.”

Ben was candid about his struggle with second guessing himself. He took a good, hard look at himself. After the workshop Ben told me he felt like a burden had been lifted off his back. Good work, Ben.

Now it’s your turn. Answer the following questions:

  1. What are three strengths you bring to building your business?
  2. What are three challenges you face in building your business?
  3. Looking at the most difficult challenge you identified, is there something more you know about this challenge?
  4. Think hard now. What, if any internal messages do you have about yourself that would make it difficult for you to overcome your main challenge?
  5. Is there a positive message you have about yourself that can replace your negative message?
  6. Name several ideas you have to deal with your main challenge

If confronting and doing something about your challenges seems daunting, take a step back and focus on your strengths.

One final note:

“Our ability to handle life’s challenges is a measure of our strength of character.”

Les Brown

For more information about relationship and referral-based marketing, click HERE.